Irish government takes wraps off new cloud research centre

News Caroline Donnelly Nov 27, 2012

The Irish Centre for Cloud Computing and Commerce (IC4) wants to help companies use cloud research to boost business.

A new government-funded technology centre has been opened in Dublin to help stimulate the development and adoption of cloud computing in Ireland.

It is called the Irish Centre for Cloud Computing and Commerce (IC4) and will be located at Dublin City University.

The team there will also be able to draw on further cloud research resources from University College Cork (UCC) and Athlone Institute of Technology.

The centre’s researchers will be encouraged to partner with firms to pass on their cloud knowledge so it can be used to benefit the Irish economy.

The plans have already won the backing of Microsoft, Fujitsu, IBM and Intel, with representatives from all four firms serving on the centre’s industry panel

IC4 was opened by Richard Bruton TD, Irish minister for enterprise and jobs.

In a statement, Bruton hailed cloud as a significant part of the overall IT market, explaining that this is why the Irish government is banking on it for economic growth.

"We must ensure we continue to support cutting-edge scientific research, but also that we put in place measures to ensure that we can turn the good ideas emerging from that research into good jobs,” said Bruton.

“That is why we have developed this industry-led technology research centre, to bring industry and researchers together so that they can focus on creating viable businesses and ultimately create the jobs we need,” he added.

Professor Brian MacCraith, president of Dublin City University, said the centre’s opening reaffirm’s the organisation’s commitment to industry collaboration.

“The development of this industry-led translational research centre with industry and research partners builds on [the university's] distinctive research strengths and represents an opportunity to develop the cloud computing industry both at home and abroad,” MacCraith added.