Huddle hails G-Cloud success

News Jane McCallion Jan 18, 2013
Cloud in hands
Cloud in hands

Collaboration player takes 14 per cent of contracts and is used by 80 per cent of government departments, it claims

Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) collaboration firm Huddle strengthened its position as a government cloud services provider in 2012, according to its most recent set of results.

The company claims to have doubled the number of public sector deals it closed in the 2011/12 financial year within the first eight months of 2012/13.

Of the 95 contracts awarded through the Government’s G-Cloud framework since April 2012, 14 per cent have gone to Huddle, making it the largest supplier in terms of engagement, the company said.

Furthermore, Huddle is now reportedly used in 80 per cent of Central Government departments.

Simon O’Kane, Huddle’s vice president, told Cloud Pro the secret of the company’s public sector success is that it allows departments to work together without breaking the rules.

“What has driven our original adoption [within Government] is the ability to work across the firewall,” O’Kane said.

“In our early days we heard people had been collaborating between departments by printing off documents and hiding them in books [to take] them out of the building...because it was so hard to share information between departments,” he explained.

Huddle’s secure network allowed them to overcome that hurdle, he added.

Many of these deals have been done outside the G-Cloud framework, as was revealed during a panel session at Huddle’s Government in the Cloud conference earlier this week.

All three public sector representatives –  Christopher Cox of Cheltenham Borough Council, Alex Long of the Coleridge Medical Centre, and David Ogden of the Education Funding Agency –  said they had bypassed G-Cloud to procure Huddle's services.

O’Kane admitted that, as time goes on, the percentage of G-Cloud contracts won by Huddle may not be as high as last year.

“We were an early adopter...and it is nice for us [to have such a high percentage], but in iteration two and three there have been more and more true cloud vendors coming on,” O’Kane told Cloud Pro.

“So we remain strong, but there are a lot more people coming on [as suppliers] and that is great for the Government and the industry,” he concluded.