Huddle sounds security alarm over personal cloud and device use

News Jane McCallion May 31, 2013
digital padlocks
digital padlocks

43 per cent store documents on consumer services, while 91 per cent use personal devices

Cloud collaboration company Huddle has warned companies about the dangers of employees storing work documents on personal clouds and storage devices.

In a survey of 2,000 office workers carried out by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the company for its first ‘State of the Enterprise Information Landscape’ report, 43 per cent admitted to putting work files onto personal cloud services.

Dropbox was the most popular consumer tool used by employees to store enterprise documents (22 per cent), followed by Apple iCloud (14 per cent) and Google Drive (13 per cent).

However, 91 per cent of respondents said they also used personal devices, such as USB sticks, to share, access or work on documents.

When asked why, 52 per cent said they want access to all their documents in one place, while 56 per cent said they want to be able to work effectively from anywhere.

Alastair Mitchell, CEO and co-founder of Huddle, told Cloud Pro: “What people want to do is very different to what they are being forced to do. They want to access data wherever they are and that is a trend which is only going to get bigger.

“This is going to change the way IT is delivered.”

Mitchell put the reason workers are using non-business applications down to expectations being raised in the consumer sphere.

“Although these tools are available in our consumer lives, there are not many vendors yet that can provide the security and the capability to be able to provide these sorts of collaborative and cloud content ways of working for the enterprise,” Mitchell said.

Nevertheless, he believes this both follows the pattern of previous IT trends and will change over time.

“People need time to adapt in the enterprise. Consumer technology applications have always taken the lead and are more quickly adopted.

“However the tools are now there and Huddle is just one of them – there is a huge market starting to evolve with start-ups starting to evolve and grow into the mainstream.”